Introducing….. Spine by Rem Eyewear [Natasha Spiering]

One of the newest lines I’ve added to the office is Spine. I have to say I’m loving it and so are my patients. Spine frames feature a patented segmented hinge and cable system that flexes the temples holding the frame in place on the wearers head. It is a great frame for patients of most sizes. I myself have their sunglasses and can say that the frame is extremely comfortable. Not only are they comfortable but the frames are very attractive. I’ve only had the frames in the office for about 2 weeks and they have been selling like crazy. Check them out! 

SELECT to learn more about Natasha Spiering IFlorida)
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Refueled [Jody A. Shuler]

Who needs their tank refueled? Many of us feel the drain of the long winter as well as the everyday taxing of our brains at our offices. Whether it be the grind of office politics, the annoyance of insurance filing and processing VCP orders, clients not wanting to spend beyond their VCP limit. You name it they all drain us of our energy and most importantly our creative juices. What do you do to REFUEL? Well for me I go to the shows whenever I can. I especially enjoy VEE. It is at this show that I learn about what is coming in the not so distant future, whether it be stylish new frames or new lens technology, I also joy getting my geek on in the lab equipment areas. So now hat expo is behind us I hope you enjoyed yourselves and refueled the tank. I know my tank is on full. Who wouldn’t be after seeing such gorgeous eyewear like this Francis Klein and not only that I was able to speak with Mrs. Klein. What a cool small company. This particular piece just blew me away. The detail is amazing. Enjoy and please share!! 

SELECT to learn more about Jody Shuler (New York)
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History Lesson [Marlon Wilson]

We are really feeling our MOSCOT collection. This is a company that has been around for 100 years and they really have their stuff together. 

MOSCOT was first installed in America by, Hyman Moscot, who arrived from Europe via Ellis Island in 1899. Hyman began selling ready-made eyeglasses from a pushcart on Orchard Street on Manhattan’s famed Lower East Side. Since then the company has remained in the family. 

Their collections are based on styles from their old archives to give them a truly old school feel. They have an arsenal of sunglasses and their overall collection is very deep. 

SELECT to learn more about Marlon Wilson (Minnesota)
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Fabulous & Funky: Francis Klein [Lindy Faulkner]

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A new Francis Klein collection has arrived at our midtown store and I’m in love!! The colors and shapes are so unique and each one is hand crafted in Paris. I reached my five year anniversary at Eclectic Eye this year so I decided to go a little crazy with a new pair of sunglasses to celebrate! I knew it had to be Francis Klein!

I decided on the Frou Frou. I was immediately drawn to the shape and once I found this pattern I couldn’t resist. The iridescent checkerboard pattern really shines in the sunlight and gives the frame a color changing effect depending on how the light hits.

Keeping with the multicolor of the frame I decided to add a gradient rainbow mirror to the lenses. This makes the frame pattern pop and really cuts excess glare on bright days. The mirror is paired with a premium digital lens by Shamir called the Autograph III.

Needless to say I’m so pleased with the way they turned out and I’ve always got my fingers crossed for a beautiful, bright day so that I can sport my fabulous new sunnies!!!  

SELECT to learn more about Lindy Faulkner (Tennessee)
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To Wood or Not To Wood? [Heather Stearns]

Frames pictured: Belmont Zebrawood by Shwood Eyewear, Boise Maple by Proof Eyewear, Bombay Walnut by Parkman, and Bonnie/Clyde Two Tone by Capital Eyewear.

Frames pictured: Belmont Zebrawood by Shwood Eyewear, Boise Maple by Proof Eyewear, Bombay Walnut by Parkman, and Bonnie/Clyde Two Tone by Capital Eyewear.

While some companies are exploring the best plastics and metals for eyewear, others are stepping outside the box and finding new, appropriate materials.  In doing a search for “wooden sunglasses”, I found at least a dozen companies currently offering some type of wooden frame.  All kinds of woods are being utilized for this new craze as companies are trying to find the best combinations, strongest materials, and most stylish/desirable grain patterns. 

I’ve not had the opportunity to feel (and most importantly to try on) a wooden frame until attending my FIRST EVER Vision Expo last weekend in New York City.  I stopped by the Parkman Sunglasses booth and got to speak with Christopher Shalhoub, one of the two brothers who began the company.  The idea that the two brothers were inspired from a trip to Maine and are now crafting these in the USA (New Jersey more specifically) really caught my attention.  The frames were much lighter than I expected them to be and were very sharp looking.  One of the coolest aspects that Christopher was showing me was that some of their frames are made from recycled vinyl records, scrapped guitar fret boards, and drums!  If you’ve read my previous blogs, you know how much I love music so this melted my heart.  The only question I had: How do you adjust wooden frames?  Obviously, you can’t really (Christopher smiled at this question and said you can really tell the difference when an Optician is looking at a new line versus a retailer).

My patient base is deep in the rural community of New Hampshire and Vermont and I am surrounded by individuals who enthusiastically support local businesses and love “rustic” anything, but I’m not sure that I’m confident enough yet to inject a wooden frame line into my inventory.  I’m going to reach out to my customers before making the commitment and I’m hoping for a positive reaction.  What could be better than wearing a maple frame in a community that thrives on maple syrup?!

SELECT to learn more about Heather Stearns (New Hampshire)
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ULTEM! Gotta Love it! [Johnna Dukes]

Are you as in love with ULTEM (or TR-90) as I am? In my humble opinion, this is the most exciting innovation in the way of frame manufacturing that I have experienced in some time! Frames made with ULTEM are lighter in weight, incredibly durable, and available in tons of colors! Better still, when you have a patient try on a frame made of ULTEM, they feel the difference, these things practically jump off my shelves! If you haven’t seen them, check them out, several companies are embracing the trend! Love it!!

SELECT to learn more about Johnna Dukes (Iowa)
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Cazals, man. [Bret Hunter]

The Legends. Not many of our customers can pull off Cazals. Not many people anywhere can pull them off. They’re oversized and bold and sharply geometric and they shout from your face so loudly that if your character isn’t of a certain substance and style the glasses end up wearing you. Every now and then someone picks one up and puts it on and walks to the mirror (and I love watching this moment because you suddenly see the person stand up a little straighter). They step back and then step in for a close-up. They smile, because it’s really all you can do when you’ve got a Cazal on your face and it looks that good on you. They give themselves a double-take because they see a slightly cooler face than the one that walked into the store a moment ago. 

“Oh man”
“Damn”
“Wow”
Etc.

They say these things to themselves, not to be heard but just because noises slip out. It’s about them, in this moment. It’s about their personal transformation behind the frame. It’s about accepting what they see and liking it. 

And then they buy the Cazals. 

Shown here is an 866 we just got in, but I wear the 858 with a custom Rx lens, gradient tint. It’s my party frame.

Art & Science [Daniel Brunson]

I am passionate about art and science. I see the optical industry as this nice harmony between those two forces. On one side you have the eyewear design aspect, which allows for free flowing creativity among artists. As a designer you also have to understand the other side. The other side is filled with opticians fitting lenses into your frames and then subsequently fitting your frames onto their client’s faces. It is that second part that makes eyewear a very technical product. It is one thing to make beautiful art, but it takes a very different set of skills to combine something beautiful with something as scientifically functional as a set of prescription lenses. The designer and the optician each need to understand both the science and the art involved.

My favorite collections epitomize this concept. I can see it right away in a frame that has been designed with the optician’s work in mind. These frames are a joy to work with because they are nice to look at on the face and they easily accommodate prescription lenses.

When I see a frame made by a designer who understands this I know it right away. I become inspired to find the right face and the right skin tone to highlight the frame. The beautiful thing is that in working through this process the right frame brings out the best features in a face. This is the approach we use at Hicks Brunson Eyewear when styling our clients.

I love working with the Tom Davies collection because it offers me the freedom to redesign and customize frames. This is the freedom to work on the artistic side of the equation. I have made hundreds of bespoke frames for clients and created new designs of ready to wear frames that we stock. It has been through this design process that I have found a deep appreciation for the art and science of eyewear.

SELECT to learn more about Daniel Brunson (Oklahoma)
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Bragging [Alison Rolli]

This lovely woman in her gorgeous new glasses is my patient. We searched and searched for the right frame for her over a few visits and we were close but I could tell none of them were the perfect one. She wanted neutral colors, but still a unique and fun shape. I remembered that one of the frames where she loved the style but not the color, came in this taupe and black. I ordered it in (Dutz 515) and she was in love. This is one of those moments where I’m really proud to be an optician! Don’t they look AMAZING on her!?!?

SELECT to learn more about Alison Rolli (Wisconsin)
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​New Arrivals! [Alexander Bennett]

Freshly arrived from Vision Expo, this month Peepers Optical is welcoming 2 new lines into our store: Matsuda Eyewear and Beausoleil Eyewear. Both lines are absolutely stunning, with modern and elegant styling reminiscent of yesteryear.

Matsuda Eyewear: Classic and elegant, the line showcases bold shapes in quietly sophisticated shades. Beautiful Japanese acetate and titanium pieces, uniquely sculpted as updated versions of timeless eyepieces. Architecturally designed elements are displayed in the form-fitting nose pads seen in the sunglasses. The filigree and details display an impeccable attention to detail, and make an excellent accent piece for the discerning patient.

Beausoleil: Wonderfully accented, marbled acetate frames for the fun and free-spirited! These frames bolster flair for the dramatic through unique shapes and whimsical colors. While more classic looks are available, we chose the more unique colors and shapes from the line to add some fun and creative options to our lines. These frames reflect the personality of those craving original styles and forward fashion.

A special thanks to Katie Lauver from her blog on Saturday, May 2, 2015 – I definitely stole her idea to showcase the frames on the plants (and great blog! Definitely using a few of the ideas to bolster our social media!!)

SELECT to learn more about Alexander Bennett (Colorado)
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