SY-1010

SY-1010

Specifications
Polyphony –
1 Voice
Multitimbral –
1 Part
Oscillators –
1 VCO
Waveforms –
Saw Up
LFO –
1 LFO with Sine
VCA/Envelopes –
1 VCA with ADSR envelope
Keyboard –
32 keys

Naomi Bolton
Tue, 06/09/2020 – 08:29

Not all of the Japanese synthesizers built during the seventies and eighties were destined for greatness and the SY-1010 by Technics is one of the ones that are often overlooked. This might be due to the fact that it is one of the simplest synths in terms of features which is evident by the fact that it only has a single oscillator with one waveform.

Apparently, the only way to get your hands on one of these synths back when they were first released was to visit a Technics showroom in Japan. Although it bears the Technics moniker, it was actually released by Matsushita and was marketed along with other of the high-end products in the Technics home audio range.

What the SY-1010 has to offer is a solitary sawtooth oscillator and a low pass filter. You can apply ADSR to these or get some tremolo effects using the sine wave LFO. It certainly doesn’t have the depth or variety that a lot of other synths have and owners of the SY-1010 seem to agree that it has a bit of a melancholic sound to it.

The build quality of the SY-1010 is fairly decent for its time and it comes encased in solid plastic. Unfortunately, this synth is prone to discoloration, so finding one in mint looking condition could prove challenging. The keyboard features 32 keys, but don’t expect anything like a pitch bend or mod wheel. The layout of the SY-1010 is very simple and straightforward as everything is neatly arranged and clearly marked. The front panel is divided into six panels with the power button and LFO knob on the left, followed by a block diagram showing how the synth works. Next to this is the ADSR section with four sliders followed by a section for the Noise and VCO knobs as well as knobs for LFO Depth, VCO Level, and Fine Tuning. The VCF section has sliders for the Cut Off Frequency and Resonance along with dials for LFO Depth, KYBD CV, and ADSR Depth.

Finally, the VCA section has an Initial Gain knob and LFO Depth as well as ADSR Depth. Considering the age of this synth it’s no surprise to see a lack of MIDI, CV, or gate interface on the back. What you do get is an RCA output marked “Low” and HIgh” as well as a level switch that is marked “Normal/Boost.” Judging by the Japanese warning displayed below this switch it’s apparently possible to blow your speakers when using “Boost” so take care. Next to these is the second output section where you can connect a standard 1/4″ jack.

Even the most simple of modern monosynth is going to beat the SYS-1010 in terms of features, so this is strictly one for the collectors. Provided you can find one in working condition at a reasonable price.

Make

Year
1979

Musical genre

Synth type

Interface features

Format

Sound types

Price range

Image
SY-1010

Files
Type
Link

YouTube

Technics SY-1010

by

AutomaticGainsay

Technics SY-1010 Analog Monophonic Synthesizer (1979) Test

by

SUBTOKYOSHOP

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Five Albums Made Predominantly With One Synth

Five Albums Made Predominantly With One Synth
Naomi Bolton
Tue, 06/09/2020 – 08:46

Hybrid Minds interview

Knowledge editor Colin Steven speaks to Hybrid Minds about rescheduling their tour and 2020 festival dates, recent single with DRS and what else they’re up to.

The post Hybrid Minds interview appeared first on Kmag.

Everyone Can Play Music With Joué Play

Everyone Can Play Music With Joué Play
Naomi Bolton
Tue, 06/02/2020 – 13:10

M.Brane 11

M.Brane 11

Specifications
Polyphony –
1 Voice
Oscillators –
2
LFO –
2 LFO With Saw Up, Saw Down, Square, Triangle
Controls –
MIDI In/Out
Memory –
110 Patches RAM, 110 Patches ROM

Naomi Bolton
Mon, 06/01/2020 – 09:14

The M.Brane 11 is a dedicated percussion module from JoMox that was released in 2010. This single voice analog synth is optimized to produce membrane-like snare or percussion drum sounds and is fully controllable by MIDI. JoMox was able to replicate the actions of real acoustic percussion by making use of two T-bridge oscillators. Not only do these have pitch and dampen controls, but they can also be coupled with each other for the creation of an analog membrane.

In terms of connections, the M.Brane 11 has a 9V DC plug, MIDI In for connecting another MIDI device and Midi Out for connecting it to a MIDI capable device. It also has a Trigger In audio input, which can be used to trigger the M.Brane 11 via an audio signal or drum pad. Finally, the M.Brane 11 has a mono Audio Out to connect it to an audio mixer or amplifier.

The M.Brane 11 comes with 110 pre-programmed factory sounds. These can be accessed during “preset” mode using the endless value knob. The Play button can be then be used to trigger and listen to the sounds. This synth also features 8 parameters that can be adjusted to achieve the sound you want. The active parameter can easily be seen thanks to a handy LED column. Users can adjust the decay time of the M.Brane 11, the pitch of the first and second membrane oscillator, the decay of sound using M1 Dampen, and M2 Dampen, as well as the coupling between M1 and M2 or M2 and M1. Also, you can control the intensity of the noise signal that creates the snare drum noise or metallic attacks. Further tweaks can be made with the 6 dB/octave low pass filter, MetNZe A, which changes the noise of the noise filter to a metallic noise, Gate, which controls the gate time for the trigger of the analog T-OSC circuitry and Volume, which controls the main volume of the M.Brane 11.

The Master parameters can be selected with the up/down buttons of the M.Brane 11 and the endless value knob is then used to change values. Using these you can select the MIDI channel on which the M.Brane 11 sends and receives MIDI, the LFO wave, speed of the LFO modulation, the intensity of the LFO, and more. These buttons are also used to store a sound preset.

Overall, M.Brane 11 was an affordable and unique little synth.

Make

Year
2010

Musical genre

Synth type

Interface features

Sound types

Price range

Image
M.Brane 11

Files
Type
File

Title
User Manual

Description
JoMox M.Brane 11 User Manual

YouTube

JoMoX M.Brane 11 Produktvideo

by

LaconicRecordsStudio

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Retro Console Hardware Synths (Part One)

Retro Console Hardware Synths (Part One)
Naomi Bolton
Sun, 05/31/2020 – 13:44

Best Portable Midi Keyboards For Mobile & Laptop Producers

Best Portable Midi Keyboards For Mobile & Laptop Producers
Naomi Bolton
Thu, 05/28/2020 – 13:32

Syntovox 222 Vocoder

Syntovox 222 Vocoder

Specifications
Oscillators –
1 VCO
Effects –
White Noise
Filter –
10 Filters

Naomi Bolton
Mon, 05/25/2020 – 08:38

The Syntovox 222 Vocodor was released in 1981 by Synton, the Dutch brand who also worked on the Syrinx as well as Fenix I and Fenix II synths. The Syntovox 222 is a 1 HE rack-mounted module and was quite a high-end instrument for its time.

Synton advertised the Syntovox 222 as a simplified, yet versatile adaptation of the larger Syntovox 221 studio vocoder. The Syntovox 222 is a vocoder, so it imparts vocal articulation to musical signals. This is accomplished via two inputs, one that is used for balanced microphone signals while the other handles line-level signals.

For output, the Syntovox 222 used the articulated carrier analog with adjustable amounts of straight speech and/or carrier signals. For increased intelligibility, Synton also included an internal unvoiced sound synthesizer. The Syntovox 222 also has panel switches that can be used to turn the articulated carrier and unvoiced sound signals on and off. Alternatively, the same can be accomplished by making use of an external footswitch.

The front panel of the Syntovox 222 has the “Speech” and “Carrier” knobs on the left of the module and these are used to control the level of the speech input fed to the vocoder and to control the level of the carrier fed to the vocoder. Next to these are the Cleanfeed Speech and Cleanfeed Carrier knobs along with the Hoise/HF Syn knob. The Cleanfeed Speech knob is used to control the amount of speech signal that is mixed with the effect output while the Cleanfeed Carrier knob controls the amount of carrier signal mixed with the effect output. With the Noise/HF Syn knob you have control over the amount of noise that is mixed with the effect output. Finally, on the far right of the front panel you’ll find the “OUT” knob and jack for the footswitch. The rear panel is just as sparse and has MIC, LINE, and CARRIER Line inputs along with one “Out” jack.

Synton has a bit of a cult following for their products, but since the Syntovox 222 was handbuild in the Netherlands, it can be difficult to track down in some parts of the world. It does produce very smooth vocoder sounds, so it’s no surprise that the Syntovox 222 ended up being one of the best selling vocoders for Synton. The Syntovox 222 also cropped up in different parts of the world under different brandings, such as being the Dynacord SRV66 in Germany.

Make

Year
1981

Musical genre

Synth type

Interface features

Format

Sound types

Price range

Image
Syntovox 222 Vocoder

Files
Type
Link

YouTube

Synton Syntovox 222 vocoder test

by

ian hall

syntovox 222 vocoder

by

debauche node

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Niels Gordon Streams Live Concert From The Woods

Niels Gordon Streams Live Concert From The Woods
Naomi Bolton
Fri, 05/22/2020 – 08:07

Volca Nubass

Volca Nubass

Specifications
Polyphony –
1 voice
Multitimbral –
1 part
Oscillators –
1
Waveforms –
Saw Up, Square, Sub Oscillator
VCF –
1
LFO –
1
VCA –
1 VCA with AD envelope
Controls –
MIDI In
Sequencer –
16-steps sequencer
Patterns –
16 patterns

Naomi Bolton
Tue, 05/19/2020 – 09:48

The Korg Volca Nubass is a powerful bass synth that bases its sound source around a vacuum tube oscillator. It was released in 2019 as a sort of update to the very popular Korg Volca Bass from a few years ago. The name is derived from the “Nutube” tech that Korg has used for this synth, which is essentially a modern refresh of the classic vacuum tube.

The original Volca Bass featured three oscillators and all of them could be tuned and played independently of each other. With the Nubass the Nutube tech is used for the main oscillator while also adding saturation to a sub-oscillator. The main oscillator can still be switched between square and saw waves while volume and saturation levels can be controlled on the sub-oscillator. Modulation is also largely handled the same way as the original Bass with an envelope generator and LFO. The only difference is that you can’t route the envelope generator of the Nubass to the VCA. The Nubass does have an attached step sequencer and it allows for both accent and slide functions. Also, it boasts analog overdrive, which is serviceable, but not as powerful as expected.

In terms of design, the Nubass continues with the style of the Volca range. The size and feel of the unit are the same as most of the other Volca units, so it will fit in nicely if you already have a collection. It’s also as light as the rest of the range and can be powered by six batteries or via an optional power supply. The most striking new addition is obviously the glowing tube at the top of the unit. Although it looks like a gimmick, it actually does drive the sound of the Nubass quite well in addition to looking very neat. The sounds it produces are not quite as warm, thick, and rich as a traditional vacuum tube, but thankfully it is a lot more reliable and resilient. The fact that it uses much less power than a classic valve amp is also a big plus.

Korg designed the Nubass specifically for acid bassline and as such it’s hard to fault it. Thanks to its speaker and battery compartment the Nubass is one of the most portable acid synths on the market, which is reason enough for most people to covet one. It doesn’t have anything exciting in terms of inputs or outputs, but it does exactly what it is designed to do.

Make

Year
2019

Musical genre

Synth type

Interface features

Sound types

Price range

Image
Korg Volca Nubass

Files

YouTube

KORG volca nubass: Delivering huge bass via a real vacuum tube

by

Korg

KORG volca jam pt.1 | volca nubass, sample, and keys

by

Korg

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Monophonic instruments

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